Propeller for Motor Planning and Hand-Eye Coordination

Hand powered flying propeller for motor planning and hand-eye coordinationThe Skinny: This is an inexpensive, yet very fun toy for kids to play with.  It may take a bit of practice to get the coordination to get the propeller to lift off.  But, once you have it down, it’s a lot of fun.  It’s also a great feeling to know that your own power can get something to fly! (You can see my kid doing it below…)

What it is: Hand powered propeller (dragonfly)

What it’s used for: Motor planning and hand-eye coordination

Ways to use it:

  • Motor Planning:
    1. You can start with either 2 or 3 below, depending on where you feel your kid is developmentally ready.
    2. I would start off with mom or dad just flying the propeller in the air and having your kid catch it.
    3. Have your kid just spin the propeller to get it to lift off, don’t worry about catching it till later.
    4. Lastly, have them both spin and catch the propeller.  It takes a bit of practice, but it’s a lot of fun, and once you do it a few times, it’s very rewarding to know you have accomplished it.

Where to find it: With over 180 ratings at over 4 stars, here on Amazon

The Source: Just watching my kid!

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Propeller for Motor Planning and Hand-Eye Coordination was originally published on KidConnectionZ

Screwball Scramble for Motor Planning and Language

Screwball Scramble for motor planning and languageThe Skinny: This is a fun Rube Goldberg type game that really works on your motor planning.  It’s a cross between a marble run game and the board game Mousetrap.  There are 7 obstacles to move your ball through.  Each one has its own joystick or button to maneuver the ball with.  The goal is to move the ball through the course.

What it is: Screwball Scramble

What it’s used for: Motor Planning and Language

Ways to use it:

  • Motor Planning:
    • I would start with just successfully doing one task, then move up from there, one at a time.
    • I would progress to setting up sequences to solve, to encourage their constant accomplishments
    • Lastly, once they have solved the entire board.  I would pull out the timer.  For some kids, competing against their own time or that of a friend, is a great motivator.  The goal with having your child do this task faster and faster is that they are working from muscle memory, versus thinking through every step.  Similar to breathing, you don’t realize that you are doing it, but you are.  You don’t think about it, you just do it.  Like walking.  We want the fingers and the brain to work simultaneously.
  • Screwball Scramble for motor planning and languageLanguage:
    • For language, I would be constantly describing all the different segments with unique descriptive words: Lever boards, rails, tubes, ringing bell, etc.  There are several different areas to describe that you can build multiple new words into your child’s vocabulary.
    • Then, if your child is ready for it, and the game motivates them, you can have them name pieces of the game with the new words you have just taught them.  “Label 3 items to the get the next ball to play with” It’s a bit ABA, but it does get the repetitive practice in.

Where to find it: With 4+ stars on Amazon here!

The Source: Found it at a toy store in South Bend

Screwball Scramble for Motor Planning and Language was originally published on KidConnectionZ

Dice for Vision Convergence

Dice Stacking for vision convergenceThe Skinny: This is a quick, easy, and fun activity that works vision convergence simply because you need two eyes to focus or you can’t do the challenge.  It’s balancing dice on the end of a tongue depressor or popsicle stick that you are holding in your mouth. (see photos) If someone didn’t tell me, I would have thought it was a birthday party game!  (oh wait, I think it is!)

What it is: Dice balancing on the end of a popsicle stick or tongue depressor

What it’s used for: Vision convergence

Ways to use it:

  • Dice Stacking for vision convergenceVision Convergence:
    • First, just start with holding the popsicle stick or tongue depressor in your mouth. The tongue depressor is wider and easier to work with, or, to make it more challenging,  use the popsicle stick.  Place one die on it, then two, and so on.  We were working with five.
    • Once your kid has figured out how to balance all 5 (or more!) then ask them to count the dots that they see.  It forces longer convergence and more attention to detail.
    • Once your kid has mastered that piece, raise the challenge, give them an order to put the dice in. 1-5 or five random numbers to work on their short term memory as well.  They have to then look at the die they are grabbing next and then to the dies that are on their stick.  Forcing some natural convergence and divergence!

Dice Stacking for vision convergenceWhere to find it: Typically, you can find this around the house.  But, you can get the dice and tongue depressors or popsicle sticks (more challenging) on Amazon.  Please remember, if you buy it through me you don’t pay any difference, and I get a small percentage. Thank you.

The Source: Dr. Major – Central Coast Vision and Learning – 805.431.1050

 

 

 

Dice for Vision Convergence was originally published on KidConnectionZ

Hyper Dash for Motor Planning and Sequencing

The Skinny: Hyper Dash is a fun, easy to set up game that can can be easy to play and progress to much more challenging.  In a nutshell, set up the different colored domes around your room, yard, house, etc, and then turn the hand held device on.  It will tell you a number or color, RUN…

Hyper Dash for Motor Planning and Sequencing was originally published on KidConnectionZ